Text Size

Holidays / Fund Raisers

Many of the holidays were celebrated as we do now with a few exceptions.EASTER was a holy day with the family gathering for a large Sunday meal after church. Somefamilies had the ritualistic "Who can eat the most eggs?" breakfast and an Easter Egg Huntusing decorated boiled eggs.HALLOWEEN or Hallowe'en (Allhallow-even) was usually celebrated with a school orcommunity party.

 

According to some of the stories just the older children went out to play tricks.These usually meant upsetting outhouses, letting someone's cows or livestock run loose,swapping horses and so on....

 

In those days the police rarely got involved since everything wasjust in fun. Bean suppers were usually held at the church the following day to celebrate AllSaints Day.CHRISTMAS in Hannah LaBrash's youth meant one gift per child which was tied onto the tree.They were seldom wrapped, unless that was part of the gift. Practicality as well as desire wereoften chief considerations when giving gifts.A few days before Christmas a tree was brought in and decorated with small candles (thatweren't often lit for fear of fire) and bits of tinsel or handmade decorations such as popcorn andpaper strings.BOX SOCIALS consisted of imaginatively decorated shoe boxes which usually containedsandwiches, pie, cake and fruit.Decorations were limited only by your creativity and sometimes the more elaborate exteriorsmade up for any deficiencies inside.

 

The boxes were auctioned off to men who had the privilege of eating the lunch with the gal whohad prepared it and whose identification remained secret until the box was opened and thename was read. If you had a clue as to what your girlfriend's container looked like you would bidwildly when it came up for sale.

 

Friends would get suspicious and deliberately bid against you.Some desperate gents actually paid up to forty dollars for their lunch!As many as 20 to 25 boxes were auctioned at a time with the money collected going to thechurch.PIE SOCIALS meant that pies were placed in low, opened and decorated boxes so that theprospective buyers could see what kind of pie it was. Sometimes the pie contained a harmlesssurprise such as a grain of rice or toothpick. Someone would take that pie around and sellguesses, whoever guessed the surprise in the pie would get the pie.STRAWBERRY FESTIVALS were usually held in early summer. They were put on by thewomen of the church and for a 25 cent admission fee you could eat as much strawberryshortcake as you wanted.

 

The cake, made with either a rich tea-biscuit dough or sponge cakedough, was sandwiched with rich cream and decked with huge tame strawberries.TRAVELLING APRON was a money maker used by groups or organization. The group (church)would send an apron around town and you were expected to tuck in some money. You werethen to sew a patch over the money with your name embroidered on it. When the apron hadtravelled about a month it was returned to the group.

 

TRAVELLING APRON was a money maker used by groups or organization. The group (church)would send an apron around town and you were expected to tuck in some money. You werethen to sew a patch over the money with your name embroidered on it. When the apron hadtravelled about a month it was returned to the group.